viernes, 7 de octubre de 2016

The Paper Airplane Guy, shows How to fold the world record paper airplane

The Paper Airplane Guy, shows How to fold the world record paper airplane

http://eng.origami-kids.com/origami-news/paper-airplane-guy-world-record.htm

paperairplane Record guiness


The farthest flight by a paper aircraft is 69.14 meters (226 feet 10 inches), achieved by Joe Ayoob and aircraft designer John M. Collins (both USA), at McClellan Air Force Base, in North Highlands, California, USA on 26 February 2012. The plane was constructed from a single sheet of uncut A4 paper. Joe Ayoob flew the aircraft designed by John M. Collins.

On Feb 26, 2012, John Collins and Joe Ayoob broke the Guinness World Record for paper aircraft distance, flying an aerodynamic paper airplane a whopping 226 feet, 10 inches (69.14 meters). You can see How to fold this plane here.

The “Paper Airplane Guy” John Collins, studied aerodynamics and origami in a quest to design the world’s most sophisticated paper projectiles. His record-breaking plane flew 226 feet. To Collins, paper airplanes aren’t just for making a ruckus in class, they can teach us a lot about science. Buuuut class disruption is an added bonus.

So, about all those paper airplanes you folded in class when you were supposed to be taking notes: Maybe you should’ve kept at it. Record-setting paper airplane pro John Collins contends that a few strategic folds of paper could really take you places. His lifelong interest in paper airplanes has evolved from playing with a simple child’s toy to a career as a professional speaker who gets crowds excited about the science and discovery behind folded paper.

Collins’ world record-setting design is named for his wife Susanne, and consists of only eight folds. Shortly after conquering the world record for paper aircraft distance. Collins shared the instructions for the paper airplane online and upped the ante by offering a $1,000 prize to anyone who could use the design to officially break his Guinness World Record.

Through trial and error, he’s also come up with designs that return to the thrower like a boomerang, exhibit incredible hang times or fly straight as an arrow, as he explains in the Great Big Story video at the top of this article.

What’s so simple about paper airplanes? Well, just about everything — and nothing. These paradoxical paper flyers can be constructed in seconds, and help those who make them develop three-dimensional thinking and fine motor skills along the way. Collins believes that building a paper airplane is a crucial entry point into “thinking like a scientist.”

The aerodynamic forces that give airplanes — both actual life-size planes and little paper models — lift is the same, and examining the “how” and “why” of paper airplanes can help us better understand flight as a whole. In fact, paper airplanes were crucial in developing the first real-life airplanes because they could be tested in a much more economical way than person-sized prototypes. Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance artist and inventor who dreamed of bringing a flying machine to life, relied on paper models to test his ideas.
Source: howstuffworks-com

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jueves, 29 de septiembre de 2016

Project-Based Learning Lesson using Paper Airplanes

Project-Based Learning Lesson using Paper Airplanes http://eng.origami-kids.com/origami-news/project-based-learning-lesson-using-paper-airplanes.htm
Project-Based Learning Lesson using Paper Airplanes

Lessons In Flight Using Paper Airplanes Research, reading, problem solving, critical thinking and an understanding of the elements of flight and aerodynamics were all utilized when Chad Bigelow, technology integration specialist at Altmar-Parish-Williamstown Elementary School visited with fifth graders in Stephanie Stanton’s class for a hands-on lesson on paper airplanes.

Students in Stephanie Stanton’s class took part in a project-based learning lesson on the elements of flight. In front from left are: Stanton; Taylor Trumble; Brian Davis; and Alex Cronk. In back from left are: Nate Dickinson (far back); Jayden Castor; Julianna Britton; Chris Redfield; Chad Bigelow, technology integration specialist; Robert Bolster; Trent Fuller; Leaha Solinsky; and Robin Schreyer, teaching assistant in the class.

The students in the week leading up to the event researched flight and studied various elements of aerodynamics and the essentials of flight

APW Elementary School Principal Julie Woolson lines up for the long distance – flight time test of her model airplane as Chad Bigelow gets set to time the flight.
APW Elementary School Principal Julie Woolson lines up for the long distance – flight time test of her model airplane as Chad Bigelow gets set to time the flight.

When Bigelow arrived for the project-based, hands-on application of what they had learned, he gave the students two different sets of instructions on how to fold a paper airplane.

The students followed the directions to complete the airplanes and tested them for two aspects of length of flight: 1) how long they stayed airborne and 2) distance traveled from the start.

The students made revisions following each flight and when they had determined what helped the planes to complete the two determining aspects for points, they then constructed, using their own design, a third plane.

Chad Bigelow gives a few tips to Robert Bolster before he launches his paper airplane during a recent paper airplane interdisciplinary STEM-based lesson on flight. Behind Bolster, Brian Davis and Jayden Castor listen to learn some new techniques.

Chad Bigelow gives a few tips to Robert Bolster before he launches his paper airplane during a recent paper airplane interdisciplinary STEM-based lesson on flight. Behind Bolster, Brian Davis and Jayden Castor listen to learn some new techniques.
Chad Bigelow gives a few tips to Robert Bolster before he launches his paper airplane during a recent paper airplane interdisciplinary STEM-based lesson on flight. Behind Bolster, Brian Davis and Jayden Castor listen to learn some new techniques.

They could incorporate some of the design from the previous test models, or create one on their own.

The flights were so successful, the classroom did not prove to be a long enough flight pattern, so the final flights moved out to the hallway where some beautiful flights took place.

Source: oswegocountytoday-com

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miércoles, 28 de septiembre de 2016

Origami in your car. That’s the way the airbag folds!

Origami in your car. That’s the way the airbag folds! http://eng.origami-kids.com/origami-news/origami-in-your-car-airbag-folds.htm
origami in your car

The integration of origami, art, and technology offers unique opportunities to create products important to society. Origami is particularly well-suited for applications such as automobile airbags because it can be very compact, expand to a large size, and it enables folded patterns to be packed into unique shapes. This flexibility in packing into different shapes is increasingly important for automobile designers. This paper describes the design, testing, and manufacture of two origami patterns for packing airbags into cylindrical spaces, and shows that when folding airbags with origami patterns, the pattern and the packing method both influence how the airbag deploys.

Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags

by Jared T. Bruton, Todd G. Nelson, Trent K. Zimmerman, Janette D. Fernelius, Spencer P. Magleby, Larry L. Howell
From: The Royal Society

Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the ‘flasher’ and the ‘inverted-cone fold’, for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver’s side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

Introduction and background

Soft Origami and use of soft-sheet materials
Objective

1. Introduction and background
1.1 Origami and engineering design
1.2. Soft Origami and use of soft-sheet materials
1.3. Objective

2. Cylindrical packing and deployment
2.1. Pattern selection and modelling
2.2. Packing methods
2.3. Deployment rotation

3. Application: automotive airbags
3.1. Packing methods applied
3.2. Deployment performance
3.3. Packing method modification based on deployment performance
3.4. Deployment performance for new packing methods


An undeployed flasher pattern with cylindrical envelope shown around it. Specified height H and diameter D are variables of interest.

4. Discussion and conclusion

In this paper, fold patterns and packing methods have been introduced and evaluated to efficiently pack soft-sheet materials into cylindrical packed shapes with configurable folded (packed) height and diameter, deployed (unfolded) shape and deployed size. Deployment performance and the impact of packing method on deployment was also explored. Twofold patterns (the flasher and the inverted-cone fold) and a total of two packing methods for the first pattern and four for the second pattern were presented as viable solutions. Application to automotive airbags was explored and results showed promise, although the flasher was shown to be less-than-ideal for driver’s side airbags and would probably be more valuable in other Soft Origami applications.

Both fold patterns have adjustable stowed height and diameter, deployed shape and deployed size while folding into approximately cylindrical shapes. We were able to influence the behaviour of the airbag using this approach, and preliminary testing showed that we were able to specify packed behaviour, unfolding behaviour via pressure difference deployment and final deployed shape. Both patterns showed favourable improvements in packing an airbag into a cylindrical shape with sufficient room underneath the packed material for an inflator.

Multiple possible methods were created and explored to fold the inverted-cone fold and flasher fold patterns using a rigid frame that is later removed. After frame removal, the folds are ready to be deployed by way of a pressure differential. The patterns, shown through an application to automotive airbag folding, accomplished the desired goals of the research. The packing methods demonstrated here have been shown to work when folded by hand (with a combination of a mechanism and human intervention), but have not yet been automated, which could be a topic of further work.

Another accomplishment of this research was the modification of packing method based on deployment performance. Although the same pattern (the inverted-cone fold) was used, different packing methods were shown to influence deployment performance, which is probably true of many Soft Origami patterns and applications. That is, unlike traditional origami, where fold lines constrain behaviour, Soft Origami allows for a more quantitative approach wherein the same pattern can be packed using many different methods (with varying fidelity to the original pattern) depending on the application constraints. However, different packing methods and levels of discretization result in packed patterns that match the original desired pattern with varying degrees of fidelity.

In conclusion, multiple patterns and packing methods were presented that are well-suited for packing a soft-sheet material into a cylindrical volume prior to deployment via internal pressure. Another unique development in this work is the use of an origami-pattern-inspired folding frame to impose the pattern on the soft-sheet materials, and then removing the folding frame and maintaining the folded shape for use in deployment via pressure difference (e.g. inflation). This is advantageous for a mechanism or structure that would present a safety hazard to humans if it had a rigid understructure when deploying. In an application to automotive airbags, we also demonstrated the principle of modifying the packing method (within the same origami fold pattern) based on deployment performance and requirements.

From: The Royal Society

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martes, 27 de septiembre de 2016

Charles Kaisin creates 2500 miniature origami pieces for Rolls Royce

Charles Kaisin creates 2500 miniature origami pieces for Rolls Royce http://eng.origami-kids.com/origami-news/charles-kaisin-origami-rolls-royce.htm
do-origami

The Belgian designer Charles Kaisin is the latest figure to join the Rolls-Royce Art Programme and will create an origami installation for the motoring marque’s London showroom. The Rolls-Royce Art Programme counts a diverse roster of artists among its alumni, … Continue reading

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sábado, 13 de agosto de 2016

Paper Boat

Paper Boat http://eng.origami-kids.com/paper-boat/origami-boat.htm
Clasic Paper Boat

How to Make an Origami Boat Are you fascinated of Origami Ships? Origami Paper Boat Tutorial I am a child of a shipman and l was attracted by water and boats throughout my childhood. My parents were captains. As a … Continue reading

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viernes, 22 de julio de 2016

What is the longest distance flown by a paper airplane?

What is the longest distance flown by a paper airplane? http://eng.origami-kids.com/paper-airplane/what-is-the-longest-distance-flown.htm
What is the longest distance flown by a paper airplane?

What is the longest distance flown by a paper airplane? by@origami_kids The farthest flight by a paper aircraft is 69.14 meters (226 feet 10 inches), achieved by Joe Ayoob and aircraft designer John M. Collins (both USA), at McClellan Air … Continue reading

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